How accumulation and line balancing can help production efficiency

There are different ways to accumulate products in a production line. For example, the products can be accumulated on an accumulation table or they can be diverted to a vertical spiral that saves floor space. You can also divert the products to several downstream machines to avoid stopping the producing machine.

 

In some production, the manufacturing machines operate faster than the packaging machines. In order to allow the manufacturing machines to run at full capacity, an accumulated production flow can be a good solution. An accumulated production flow can also allow the manufacturing machine to continue to produce products even if the packaging machine needs to be stopped. Some machines are difficult to stop and it could take a while before they are up and running again at the same speed they had prior to the stop. Thus, an accumulated production flow can increase efficiency and ensure that all machines in the production line operate at full capacity.

 

A dynamic production flow has a positive impact on the production with a high return on the investment. To accomplish a dynamic production flow, the actual production rate needs to be known either by information from machines or measured by additional sensors  so that machines upstream and downstream can share this data. This allows the machines to adapt to each other’s production pace and keep the production going. Since a dynamic flow reduces the number of times the equipment must be stopped and restarted, the method generally contributes to increased productivity and reduced wear on the equipment. The best effect of a dynamic production flow is shown in industries that produce at least 100 products per minute, such as the industry of fast moving consumer goods.

 

First of all, let us sort out the two concepts. A dynamic production flow, or line balancing, is achieved by matching the production of the machines upstream with the machines downstream. This results in a dynamic production flow where the machines manufacturing the products work at the same pace as the machines packaging the products. An accumulated production flow, on the other hand, means that you feed the production line with products in a higher pace than you package them. This leads to an accumulation of products on the production line. Worth mentioning is that a production line that uses accumulation can still attain line balancing, which regulates the speed of the machines and creates an even production flow.

 

All productions have different needs depending on, for example, industry, products and equipment. The common denominator, however, is that every type of production requires high production efficiency. Most manufacturing industries could increase their production by using line balancing, and some industries could also benefit from using accumulation. In this article, I will describe the two methods and how they can help improve production results.

 

There are different ways to accumulate products in a production line. For example, the products can be accumulated on an accumulation table or they can be diverted to a vertical spiral that saves floor space. You can also divert the products to several downstream machines to avoid stopping the producing machine.

 

In some production, the manufacturing machines operate faster than the packaging machines. In order to allow the manufacturing machines to run at full capacity, an accumulated production flow can be a good solution. An accumulated production flow can also allow the manufacturing machine to continue to produce products even if the packaging machine needs to be stopped. Some machines are difficult to stop and it could take a while before they are up and running again at the same speed they had prior to the stop. Thus, an accumulated production flow can increase efficiency and ensure that all machines in the production line operate at full capacity.

 

A dynamic production flow has a positive impact on the production with a high return on the investment. To accomplish a dynamic production flow, the actual production rate needs to be known either by information from machines or measured by additional sensors  so that machines upstream and downstream can share this data. This allows the machines to adapt to each other’s production pace and keep the production going. Since a dynamic flow reduces the number of times the equipment must be stopped and restarted, the method generally contributes to increased productivity and reduced wear on the equipment. The best effect of a dynamic production flow is shown in industries that produce at least 100 products per minute, such as the industry of fast moving consumer goods.

 

First of all, let us sort out the two concepts. A dynamic production flow, or line balancing, is achieved by matching the production of the machines upstream with the machines downstream. This results in a dynamic production flow where the machines manufacturing the products work at the same pace as the machines packaging the products. An accumulated production flow, on the other hand, means that you feed the production line with products in a higher pace than you package them. This leads to an accumulation of products on the production line. Worth mentioning is that a production line that uses accumulation can still attain line balancing, which regulates the speed of the machines and creates an even production flow.

 

All productions have different needs depending on, for example, industry, products and equipment. The common denominator, however, is that every type of production requires high production efficiency. Most manufacturing industries could increase their production by using line balancing, and some industries could also benefit from using accumulation. In this article, I will describe the two methods and how they can help improve production results.

 

 

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